THE MUSE

The story begins at the Royal Horse Show in Dublin Ireland in the summer of 1909.

The seventeen-year-old daughter of a prominent local businessman became charmed by an Austrian ten years her senior who worked as a waiter at a Dublin Hotel.

The young Irish lass was swept off her feet by the charm of the Austrian with his tales of grandeur and dreams in the most broken of English.

The muse had begun.  Romance blossomed.  The couple eloped across the Irish Sea to England, married, produced a child and settled in the city of Liverpool in England’s north-west.

The Liverpool home was somewhat timely for a visit and long stay by the younger half-brother of the  Austrian who wished to avoid enlistment and conscription for military service under the Hapsburg monarchy back in his homeland of Linz Austria.

This man who even then had the ‘Charlie Chaplin’ moustache and who would in later years become the most hated man of the twentieth century.

The muse presented an opportunity for the visiting brother in law to gain essential intelligence about Great Britain while training for his future role in the upcoming war against France and Russia.

A year before the outbreak of that war,  in 1913, the visiting brother-in-law  left Britain for Munich Germany, a place he would come to call home for the best part of the next thirty years.

Within a few months more, the older brother would also free Britain to Germany, leaving behind his Irish wife and son of three years, never to return.

Years later, that child learnt the truth about his father’s background.

As a young adult of nineteen years, he would meet his father and Uncle for the one and only time at the Nuremberg Rally of 1929.

The boy returned to England with a plea and warning to the British Government that his Uncle had plans which could and might have a holocaustic impact on the world.

It was a plea and warning which was heard but which went largely unheeded.

What happened as a direct consequence of the 1929 Nuremberg Rally is written into history.

The muse had worked.

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