HIT THE ROOF

This is a simple narrative text about car repair which will help you practice idioms.

Idioms are used a lot in English conversation and writing.

I hit the roof when I found out that it would cost $500 to repair my car.

I put on my thinking cap.

I had to figure out how to get my car fixed for less

My friend, who is a mechanic, said he would stand in for me.

He looked at my car and told me what the damage would be.

When I got to the car repair shop, I had a word in the ear of the Gaffer there.

I tried to put my best foot forward.

I didn’t want to pay through the nose or put my foot in it.

He said he would knock something off and charge only $350 but please keep it under my hat.

Our deal was strictly hush-hush.

When the day was done, I was wrecked.

I was ready to hit the sack.

NOTE

Always try using the narrative for reading writing and speaking practice.

Learn the narrative text and practice writing it from memory several times.

Practice speaking the narrative often without reading once you have learnt it.

ANALYSIS OF THE IDIOMS

Let’s take a closer look at the idioms used in this text.

HIT THE ROOF

React with surprise and shock. I did not expect the repair cost would be as high as that.

THINKING CAP

Cap is a hat. I needed to find a way to get the car repaired for less

FIGURE OUT

This is a phrasal verb and an idiom. It expresses how I can arrive to a solution to my problem.

STAND IN FOR ME

This is an expression for someone acting as a substitute for someone who is more qualified and knowledgeable about the problem (the repair of the car)

WORD IN THE EAR

This simply means speaking with the person face to face

THE GAFFER

A slang term for the Boss or Manager. It may originate loosely from the word ‘Governor’

PUT MY BEST FOOT FORWARD

This means that a good impression must be made to the Boss or Manager in order to get the best possible deal.

PAY THROUGH THE NOSE

This is an odd expression referring to the fact that I did not want to pay more than necessary to get the car fixed.

KNOCK SOMETHING OFF

It would be expected the boss/manager/gaffer would reduce the price by way of a discount.

UNDER MY HAT

If you know something, don’t tell anybody else.

HUSH-HUSH

Strictly a secret.

WRECKED

Tired. Exhausted. No energy left to continue.

HIT THE SACK

The sack refers to the ‘bed’. The expressions means going to bed because of tiredness and you are ready to sleep.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s