VERB INFINITIVE AND GERUND

This lesson connects with the ones which answer the following questions

In this lesson we will look at using the Verb Infinitive and Gerund correctly

What do you want to do?

What do you like to do?

What would you like to do

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO?

I want to sit down.

I want to stand up.

I want to study and learn English.

I want to fly like a bird.

I want to swim like a fish.

I want to go shopping.

I want to hang out with my friends.

I want to make my parents proud.

I want to speak English.

I want to practice speaking English

I want to be a successful person

I want to break free.

Notice in the highlighted sentence the structure is infinitive (to practice) plus gerund (speaking)

WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO? = WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO?

I like to swim. (infinitive ‘to’ plus the verb ‘swim’)

I like swimming. (gerund so –ing) is added to the verb

I can swim. (can is a modal verb. No ‘to’ and no ‘ing’ is used)

Swimming is good for you (Swimming becomes a noun)

See the following further examples.

I like to read. I like reading. I can read. Reading gives me knowledge.

I like to eat. I like eating. I must eat. Eating gives me energy.

I like to sing. I like singing. I can sing. Singing makes me calm.

I like to shop. I like shopping. I might shop. Shopping make me happy

Take note: I have changed ‘can’ to ‘must’ and ‘might’ but the structure is the same.

There is no word like ‘a’ ‘the’ ‘these’ before the noun in the fourth sentence ‘s’ is added to the verb in the fourth sentence for subject-verb agreement

SENTENCES/QUESTIONS USING THE GERUND

1. Do you like living in France? (working, travelling, studying)

2. What do you think about dating? (smoking, cheating, cooking)

3. I washed my hands before eating (sleeping, driving, sitting down)

4. He can’t stop talking (singing, dancing, eating)

5. I have a meeting at midday (briefing, booking, calling)

6. He risked getting caught (being)

7. It started raining an hour ago (snowing, happening, developing)

8. I’ve not finished doing my homework (writing up, preparing, copying)

9. Before coming, I put on my jacket. (leaving, setting out, departing)

10. I look forward to hearing from you (meeting, seeing, teaching)

IMPORTANT NOTE. ‘Look forward to’ is a phrasal verb. We cannot add infinitive ‘to hear’ otherwise the sentence would say ‘I look forward to to hear from you’ and that is wrong structure. It must be ‘ing’.

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